It’s late 2021, and there’s an election next year. Does anyone know where the N.H. Republican Party is?

It’s hard to say. Gov. Sununu, who portrays himself as a rational, fact-based moderate, is standing alone against the crazies in his own party.

But the crazies seem to have the momentum and the enthusiasm to turn the N.H. GOP into another clone of the Trump Party. State Rep. Andrew Prout, a Republican, is leading the charge to impeach Sununu because he isn’t more like Trump.

He’s had some victories against the crazies. Sununu forced out Republican Ken Weyler as chairman of the powerful Joint Legislative Fiscal Committee after Weyler said the COVID vaccine contained “unknown, octopus-like creatures,” that vaccinated parents were having babies with “pitch black eyes,” and the vaccine was “murdering millions of people.”

Sununu had less success with the crazies on his own Executive Council. They turned away $27 million that would have helped more people get vaccinated. The reasoning of these nutty Republicans? They’re not sure the vaccines work, COVID is no worse than the flu, and they don’t like the federal government. Sununu responded, saying, “This vote showed a reckless disregard for the lives we are losing in this battle against COVID.” Strong words from the governor of the state that has the fewest vaccinations per capita in the Northeast.

And Sununu recently had words with his commissioner of education, Frank Edelblut, who gave a glowing speech to a Libertarian organization called the “Government Integrity Project.” Sununu scolded Edelblut, “Given this fringe group’s history, the Commissioner’s decision to attend in his official capacity was inappropriate.” This “fringe group’s” mission is to end public schools.

Ahead of 2022, Republicans nationwide are scrambling for Donald Trump’s endorsement. The big question for the N.H. GOP is, will Sununu get down on his knees and ask for it? Can he win over the crazies in his own party without it?

MICHAEL HAVEY, Hancock