MONDAY, July 8

Roughly 75 motorcyclists rode north from Keene Saturday with the “Fallen 7” on their minds.

They were joined in Laconia by a similar contingent from Peterborough and thousands of bikers from elsewhere.

All were honoring the seven people on motorcycles who were killed last month by a driver in Randolph.

Firefighters and cleanup crews spent more than six hours in Bennington Saturday containing heating oil in the Contoocook River.

The oil, leaking from a basement tank, had been pumped out of a home near School Street.

Cleanup crews retrieved about 150 gallons of it, a third of which had spilled into the river.

TUESDAY, July 9

The inaugural Vermont Mad Pride celebration in Brattleboro Saturday will celebrate people with mental health conditions.

The event’s aim is to show pride, but also to speak out against discrimination.

It’s organized by Vermont Psychiatric Survivors Inc., the Hive Mutual Support Network and volunteers.

Keene’s mayor said he’d rather see City Council replacements who don’t intend to run for the positions in the fall.

The council will temporarily fill two seats recently vacated; both positions will go before voters in November.

Mayor Kendall Lane expressed concern that councilors’ votes for the interim posts could be seen as an endorsement if those candidates run again.

WEDNESDAY, July 10

Parents in the Keene School District are showing trepidation about potential grading changes.

About 50 people showed up for a meeting Tuesday on the district’s shift to a “competency-based” education model.

The model means Keene High School could eventually eliminate GPA, class rank and traditional grading.

Elsie H. “Talu” Robertson of Keene died July 4 at the age of 80.

She was influential in shaping the region and state’s child abuse and juvenile justice programs and educational policies.

She also served as a guiding force in the development of the N.H. Division for Children, Youth and Families.

Peterborough officials have scheduled a rehearing for a zoning amendment voters approved in May.

The move comes after a local shooting range challenged the change as having not been adequately explained to voters.

It included a provision restricting shooting ranges to indoor facilities, which was not made clear on the ballot.

THURSDAY, July 11

The state says a man who promised high- paying jobs in Swanzey must pay those who actually signed on.

Angelo Nastovski, owner of BetterBone Inc., announced great plans for the former Homestead Woolen Mill that never materialized.

The state last week fined him $2,300 and ordered him to pay back wages to three women who worked for him.

The vision for a proposed “arts and culture corridor” in downtown Keene is getting clearer.

Jack Dugan, president of Monadnock Economic Development Corp., outlined the Byzantine financing behind the project Wednesday.

He said a charrette is planned for the fall to gather public input on the $30 million plan.

Keene and area towns are unsure of the implications of proposed state water-pollution regulations.

The rules would set drinking water and groundwater standards for certain PFAS chemicals.

Studies have linked prolonged exposure to particular PFAS compounds to health problems.

FRIDAY, July 12

A proposal to implement campaign finance reporting for mayoral candidates took a step forward Thursday night.

A City Council panel narrowly recommended drafting an ordinance to impose such requirements.

But City Clerk Patricia Little told the committee an ordinance can’t be put in place by this November’s election.

A plan to build a gas station, store and Dunkin’ Donuts in Winchester is headed back to the N.H. Supreme Court.

It’s the third time over seven years the development proposed for the intersection of Routes 10, 78 and 119 has been brought to the state’s high court.

The appeal from the nearby Kulick’s Market focuses on traffic flow to and from Route 10.

A divided Rindge Board of Selectmen has opted to let go of Town Administrator Joe Byk.

Byk, a former longtime Peterborough selectman, has been the town administrator in Rindge for three years.

The board voted 2-1 not to renew his contract, in a closed-door session July 3.