CONCORD — Although he was born in Ireland, according to officials, a 47-year-old man named Ole Oisin wrote in a voter registration form last November that his place of birth was “Senegal, Nation of Islam,” and listed two dates of birth — one of which makes him 37 years old, and the other, just 20 years old.

Why Oisin, currently a resident of Hopkinton, included the false information when filling out the voter registration form isn’t clear, but what is known is that he entered guilty pleas Tuesday in Concord district court to the two counts of wrongful voting, with which he was charged about two weeks after the 2020 election.

The convictions on the charges, which are Class A misdemeanors, mean Oisin’s right to vote in New Hampshire is terminated, according to Attorney General John M. Formella.

In exchange for the guilty pleas, Oisin agreed to serve two concurrent 90-day jail sentences, all suspended for two years on condition of good behavior, Formella said.

Oisin is also ordered to pay a $2,000 fine, $1,000 of which is suspended for two years, on one of the charges, he added.

Formella said the investigation revealed that Oisin “submitted a voter registration form containing false material information, specifically, that his place of birth was ‘Senegal, Nation of Islam,’ and his date of birth was ‘04/19/84.’

“Also, Mr. Oisin did not provide information that he was a naturalized citizen … he was born in Ireland,” Formella said.

In addition, Oisin “submitted a domicile affidavit containing false material information, specifically, that he did not provide his actual domicile address,” Formella said. Instead, Oisin “wrote that his date of birth was ’04/2001,’and that his place of birth was ‘Senegal.’ ”

Formella said the case was prosecuted by Assistant Attorney General Nicholas Chong Yen, while the investigation was conducted by Chief Investigator Richard Tracy. Both men are members of the Attorney General’s Election Law Unit.

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